women Posts

CHIME FOR CHANGE: Takeaways from a successful girls and women campaign

Picture2In the world of philanthropy, the conversation around girls and women continues to pick up steam. Recent articles by Bill Gates and the NoVo Foundation highlight the importance of empowering girls and women, and here at GlobalGiving we’ve seen a spike in corporate interest in the topic.

We’ve learned a lot from running campaigns on this topic, like the highly successful CHIME FOR CHANGE campaign, founded by Gucci and partners Salma Hayek Pinault & Beyonce Knowles-Carter. Here are five things that have made this cause marketing effort stand out.

 1. Relevant Theme                                     

When Gucci and its partners launched CHIME FOR CHANGE, there was a clear connection between the business and the campaign’s focus on education, health, and justice for girls and women. They chose to support a cause their customers and ambassadors can easily connect with and join, which increases any campaign’s chance for success.

Key Takeaway: It should go without saying that the cause a company decides to champion should be relevant to its business. Marketing an unfocused idea that leaves the public wondering “Why?”  can be a costly distraction that won’t do much to benefit your cause, so double and triple check that the focus is intuitive to your audience and relevant to your business.

2. Global Reach, Local Impact

When CHIME  first launched with Catapult, and subsequently partnered with GlobalGiving, Gucci and its partners were looking for locally-driven projects they could impact through the campaign. Focusing on their chosen themes of education, health, and justice for girls and women, we’re using our expertise in crowdfunding and international vetting to source local projects from around the world to be featured on the CHIME FOR CHANGE website. Through its efforts to date, the campaign has raised more than $7 million to fund more than 420 projects run by 144 nonprofit partners in 88 countries. 

Key Takeaway: It may seem daunting to go global and local at the same time — from reputational risk to tax law, there’s a lot to consider. Luckily, there are organizations that have expertise in navigating the international nonprofit sphere and measuring local impact. They do it so you don’t have to and so your company isn’t left behind in the race to be both global and local with giving.  

3. Share Stories of Impact

Telling stories has been central to the CHIME FOR CHANGE campaign. From Erin Helfert’s triumph in gaining a conviction in her rape case in Moroccan court to Razia Jaweed’s journey in learning to speak upwww.chimeforchange.org features stories of women who have been empowered to make changes in their lives and communities. Managing Editor Mariane Pearl explains: “Their stories are shaping a different story for mankind, a new narrative built from the heart and made of hope.”

Key Takeaway: With so many great causes around the world worth supporting, we all wish we could just say “Please help!” and that would be enough to mobilize the world. But let’s be honest: in the fight for the global consciousness, persistent humanitarian issues don’t have it easy. Using stories can help you draw emotional connections with your audience, making your cause feel more personal and real. For tips on how to tell a great story, visit http://stillmotionblog.com/storyfirst/.

4. Help Me Help You

On the CHIME website, users aren’t in danger of clicking themselves into a confused frenzy trying to figure out how they can be a part of the cause. The first thing you see on the homepage is a Take Action link that, when clicked, prompts you to either #CHIMEIN on Facebook or Twitter or donate to support a project. Powered by GlobalGiving’s API services, anyone can easily donate to featured projects such as “Help Young Women Rebuild Nepal” or “Healing for Sexual Violence Survivors in Colombia.”

Key Takeaway: “This story really hit home for me. How can I help?”  If there’s one question any cause marketing manager can expect from the public, it’s this. Just take a look at the comments section of this recent New York Times piece. Readers were touched by the compelling story of a mother separated from her son and wanted to know how to take action. Don’t make your audience do the heavy lifting. You’ve already inspired them to want to help your cause, so all that’s left is to give them an easy way to do it. 

5. Demand the Spotlight, and Keep it Alive

CHIME FOR CHANGE certainly didn’t waste time waiting for the spotlight to fall on their campaign. Team CHIME has been busy since the start using a variety of mediums to reach different target audiences.  Just last week it was announced that CHIME has partnered with Global Citizen to present the September 2015 Global Citizen Festival in Central Park.  As a result, a tremendous amount of attention is being paid to the issues surrounding girls and women worldwide. How do they do it?

  • Earning the support of leading celebrity women like co-founders Salma Hayek and Beyoncé Knowles-Carter.
  • Launching global events like the Sound of Change Live Concert Event, which featured performers like Florence and the Machine, Ellie Goulding and John Legend, and the upcoming Global Citizen Festival®
  • Features on the world stage at prestigious gatherings like TEDWomen and International Women’s Day.
  • Harnessing the power of technology to drive change by launching Twitter campaigns like #CHIMEHACK and recent #CHIMEHACK 2.

Key Takeaway: Build it and they will come…right? Not so much.  During a time when the public is constantly bombarded with information, commanding the attention of your audience is crucial. Take a leaf out of CHIME’s book by trying different modes of communication to reach a broader audience.

 

To donate to a project through CHIME FOR CHANGE or learn more about the campaign’s work with girls and women, visit: www.chimeforchange.org

If you need help with your cause marketing campaign give GlobalGiving a call at 877.605.2314 or visit us at: www.GlobaGiving.org/corporate-partners

The Safer World Fund Nears $1 Million Milestone to Educate and Empower Women in Afghanistan and Pakistan

The Safer World Fund

After the attacks of September 11, 2001, families and friends who lost loved ones created the Safer World Fund (formerly the philanthropic arm of Our Voices Together). Since 2008, the Safer World Fund has matched donations for projects providing youth and community development in the poorest areas of the world. The total amount raised from individuals, including the matching funds, has almost reached $1 million!

The Safer World Fund recognizes that educating women is one of the best ways to make lasting change in a community, especially one at risk. UNICEF’s Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys report that educated women are more likely to educate and vaccinate their children, increase their incomes, and lift their families out of extreme poverty. Young people, especially young men, who battle with poverty, lack of education, and unemployment are most vulnerable to recruitment by terrorist groups. By educating girls and women, their families become more stable and thus decrease the risk of terrorist activity in their communities.

Read on to learn more about how Safer World Fund projects have been working in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

An AIL teacher and student

An AIL teacher and student

The Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL) operates accelerated learning centers all throughout Afghanistan, where women can take classes in many subjects, such as reading, writing, English, math, science, sewing, and even computers. Because of AIL’s widely available learning centers, women like Fariba, whose husband is working abroad, can seek help and education. Fariba’s husband mailed her a letter, but because she was illiterate, she could not read it. She took it to one of AIL’s learning centers, where many women were able to read the letter to her and assure her that her husband was safe and healthy. Fariba then decided to take her own literary classes, so she could correspond with her husband on her own. “This is such a big step for me,” she says, “and he was very happy to have a letter written by me.” AIL also supports medical clinics, mobile units, and community health workers in Afghanistan.

Sahar students picking paint for new school

Sahar students picking paint for new school

Sahar Education supports 12 schools in the northern Balkh province in Afghanistan, serving more than 28,000 girls. Before Sahar stepped in, the schools were in disrepair and teachers were undertrained. Now, curriculum is improving and computer literacy is a top priority. Recently, to celebrate the opening of a 13th school in Mazar-i-Sharif, students submitted artwork to decorate the new school. Fahima, a student at Gohar Kharton School, submitted her art because she wanted to make the new school “beautiful. War has torn our city apart and now we are rebuilding the Gohar Kharton Girls School.” “Sahar” means “dawn” in Dari, the most widely spoken language in Balkh province, and symbolizes that now is a new day for Afghan girls.

AAE student Anissa, left, and her daughter

AAE student Anissa, left, and her daughter

Aid Afghanistan for Education (AAE) runs 13 schools in 9 provinces across Afghanistan and can issue state-certified diplomas (allowing students to go on to university) because of an agreement with the government. After the age of 10, one is not allowed to re-enter the public school system, so older girls and women, who may have left school because of war or early marriage, have few options besides AAE. During the most recent graduation in Kabul, AAE celebrated Anissa, a 45-year-old mother of 9 children who have all grown up and gone on to law and medical schools. Once her children were old enough, Anissa decided she wanted to return to school herself and graduated from AAE in December. Now, she’s attending a private law university near Kabul. Anissa’s proud family attended her graduation. Her daughter said, “I am very emotional to see my mother continue her education. She has always been the center of our lives, helping us to move forward and achieve what we all have. I am very happy today.”

Marshall Direct Fund students

Marshall Direct Fund students

The Safer World Fund also supports projects in Pakistan, just a little to the east of Afghanistan. The Marshall Direct Fund provides vocational training to nearly 1,000 women in Pakistan and has helped them develop tools necessary to launch businesses, generate income, send their children to school, and lift themselves out of poverty. Education in Pakistan is crucial, not only for increasing human development but also because uneducated, impoverished youth are among the most vulnerable to be recruited by the Taliban, still semi-active in both Afghanistan and Pakistan.

DIL student Areej receiving an award

DIL student Areej receiving an award

Developments in Literacy (DIL) also works in Pakistan, in the north, to empower young girls with education. 1,500 students, including a young girl named Areej, attend DIL’s schools. Areej dreams of becoming a fashion designer, a goal supported by her parents and teachers at DIL. Before DIL, Areej attended overcrowded public schools, but now she has the opportunity to learn more quickly and follow her own path. “In that school, I didn’t have the opportunity or a chance to do something. Now, I feel confident and can present in front of my whole class.”

The Safer World Fund needs your support to reach $1 million in funding to provide alternatives to terrorism. Give today and get your donation matched for projects that support youth and community development. Pick the impact closest to your heart and provide alternatives to a lifetime of poverty and despair: http://www.globalgiving.org/leaderboards/safer-world-fund-2014/

New Read: Half the Sky

This week at GlobalGiving many of us are reading the new book Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide by Pulitzer- Prize winning journalists Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn.

While exposing the horrors women in the developing world face on a daily basis—gender-based violence like honor killings and genital mutilation, the sex trade, and high rates of easily preventable maternal mortality—the book also shows how changing the circumstances of just one woman can have a powerful ripple effect on her family and the community at-large. Through the work of our GlobalGiving project leaders, we’re lucky enough to see the effects of empowering disadvantaged women first hand.

Consider this update posted earlier this year from a women’s collective in Bihar, India who is looking to raise funds to help support their sewing centers that provide a community space and help women learn a valuable trade: “I was married two years ago and I am lucky because my husband is kind to me and gives me permission to go to the market and sewing centre. But some other members are not so lucky, but under pressure from all of us we get their husbands not to object to their wives coming to the centre. Here we are learning a useful skill but this is the only place we can meet as women in friendship and in mutual support. We are now stopping drunken behavior from the men, we have patrolled the village with 35 of us forcing the local drinking shop to close, now drunken beatings are a thing of the past and our village is more peaceful and we feel more secure.”

We’re so pleased that Kristof and WuDunn have brought this important issue to the forefront, and are humbled to be included in the book under “Four Steps You Can Take in the Next Ten Minutes.” Right now we’re featuring a great promotion; donate $100 to any GlobalGiving project and receive a copy of Half the Sky for free. Check out our Half the Sky page for some pre-selected projects that relate to the book.

If you’ve already had a chance to read the book, please share your thoughts! What story did you find the most compelling? Where do you think change needs to happen most urgently, and through what means?

BlogHers Rock!

As a member of the Board of a fast-growing Women’s Fund, it’s sometimes easy to forget that everyone doesn’t look at philanthropy through a gender lens, but Fern Portney’s post over on Philantopic caught my eye as i was catching up on my blog reading this weekend. She brings together several threads that are well known among a subset of those in the philanthropic sector, but not covered well by the mainstream philanthropy press. To excerpt the punchline:

As an advisor to the initiative, I’ve observed the following phenomena, which bode well for the future of philanthropy:

  • Women donors are strategic. They understand, deeply, the wisdom of funding women and girls.
  • They care about impact and know that women’s funds — which vet their grassroots grantees for effectiveness — are an effective way to be sure their dollars truly make a difference.
  • They are relational. They want to give in community, to give together.
  • They are egalitarian and recognize that their dollars are far less effective without “grantee partners,” the women on the front lines who know how to use the funding they provide. In the world of women’s funds, you will see donors and grantees working side by side, a Disney heiress collaborating with the director of a shelter in Harlem.
  • Women are charging ahead even as the economy falters. Women Moving Millions has quickly surpassed $90 million toward its $150 million goal.

The upshot? Women are positioned to lead the way in shaping philanthropy’s future.

Today we are pleased to be powering a campaign that aims to harness the power of the women of the blogosphere to make good on the promise inherent in Fern’s post. BlogHer – the dominant women’s blogger portal – is reaching out to 8 million women who read blogs by and for women – and launching BlogHers Act. For the next month prominent women bloggers will be featuring stories on the subject of maternal health around the world, and encouraging readers (and anyone else) to support five projects via GlobalGiving. We are very psyched to be part of this effort, and to see the power of the BlogHer community in action.

Read the press release here.

V-Day, Around the World

It’s Valentine’s Day. Or, for many people who are trying to end violence against women, it’s “V-Day.” 2008 marks the 10th Anniversary of V-Day, the brainchild of writer and performer, Eve Ensler. Who would have thought that a little play-ful of vignettes about women’s sexuality, called the Vagina Monologues, would turn into an international movement, with performances of the play taking place all over the world? Events are scheduled on college campuses, in churches, and in dozens of countries throughout 2008. They will attract thousands of people, make them more aware of the unconscionable violence that takes place against women and girls every day, and – we all hope – spur both men and women to become advocates for organizations working to change this dynamic.

Eve Ensler and Jane Fonda were on the Today Show today, talking about the anniversary. Aside from embarrassing Meredith Vieira by uttering a no-no word on network TV, they highlighted the work V-Day is doing in the Congo, where Today’s Ann Curry has been reporting for the last couple of days. Taking on rape and sexual violence again women in the Congo is truly God’s work, and it’s great to see mainstream media putting real faces and voices to the atrocities that continue. Go Ann!

We try to not be to “salesy” on this blog, but if you are interested in supporting some great organizations working to prevent and address this kind of gender violence, check out gender-based projects on GlobalGiving.

Happy V-day.