Posts Tagged ‘south africa’

 

Nightline: Soccer program views goals in more ways than one.

Posted by lisa kays on July 2nd, 2010

As some of you know, in honor of World Cup fever, we’ve been highlighting ways that soccer projects around the world are changing lives.

Last night, Nightline went one better and covered one of those projects in South Africa, providing a great article and video piece on how Academy of Hope in South Africa is helping men in prison re-direct their lives by directing the ball around the soccer field.

As Project Leader Mark Slessenger explains to Nightline, “These guys love football. It’s what they enjoy and soccer is just a way to get the guys out of the gangs. And if a guy loves soccer, he’s willing to leave the gang to come and develop because of his love for the sport.”

The program has a great success rate as well. Of 18 prisoners who have gone through it and been released, the story explains, only two have returned to prison.

Andre Soetwateer participated in the program and was released three months ago, writes Nightline. Working as an electrician, he explains, “It’s very hard, very hard. A lot of friends (are) smoking and using drugs….So for me to come outside out of prison, not doing that, is very hard for me to get in with them and try to communicate with them.”

But, he says, “I’m doing so many good things for people.  I’m so happy.”

Nightline explains that Andre is in good company in beating the odds, as the prison he walked out of–where Academy of Hope’s program is based–is the same one that Nelson Mandela walked out of in 1990.

Perhaps not coincidentally, Nightline continues,  “And soccer was key to the anti-apartheid struggle. It was a league inside the Robben Island prison, where Mandela spent 18 of his years behind bars, that served as a rallying point for the anti-apartheid movement.”

So, the legacy of soccer as a tool for good continues. Score!

Learn more:
Academy of Hope: Hope To Youth In Prison Through Soccer In Africa
GlobalGiving Soccer Projects Around The World
Nightline story: Soccer Saves: Soccer Team Changes Lives At South African Prison

Lisa Kays is GlobalGiving’s Acting Communications Director. She grew up playing soccer and knows firsthand that it’s a force for good in the world.

More about AIDS, lipstick (and World Cup) from our friends at M•A•C

Posted by Donna Callejon on June 28th, 2010

 

Last week my colleague Lisa wrote a nice piece about opportunities to support organizations leveraging sport to address social problems around the world.  Well, as much as I love Lisa, she was topped by our friend Nancy Mahon from the M•A•C AIDS Fund, who really lays it on the line her her Huffington Post piece Battling HIV/AIDS in South Africa One Goal at a Time.

For years, HIV cases in South Africa have been disproportionately concentrated among women and girls. In sub-Saharan Africa, young women between 15 and 24-years old account for 75% of total HIV infections. In South Africa specifically, a young woman is four times more likely to be HIV-positive than a South African young man…

And M•A•C has been addressing these issues since 1994.  They make grants in the US and in 66 additional countries.   And they have one of the most successful cause marketing programs in history with their Viva Glam lipstick.  Yes, lipstick is helping people with AIDS around the world.   With Cyndi Lauper and Lady Gaga front and center, 11 MILLION lipsticks have been sold.  And here’s the best part. Unlike programs that contribute $1, or even 10% per product sold, 100% of the purchase price of Viva Glam products goes to fight HIV/AIDS.  Think about what one lipstick purchase ($14) can do:

In the US…

  • Pay for 2 emergency boxes filled with non-perishable food
  • Fund the printing of 15 copies of “Tips to Eating Well with HIV/AIDS” booklets
  • Buy 18 personalized birthday cakes to be hand-delivered to a person living with HIV/AIDS on his/her birthday
  • Buy 1 week’s supply of groceries (about 4 bags of food) for 2 clients

Internationally…

  • Provide support and education for 5 pregnant women diagnosed with HIV/AIDS giving them the tools to prevent transmission to their unborn child
  • Provide 2 children with 2 meals per day at Noah’s Ark for 1month
  • Buy 1 pair of school shoes for a child orphaned by AIDS

Not bad for a tube of lipstick.

Nancy makes the following important point in her post:

Much of the press coverage around social issues in South Africa over the past week or so has focused on the high AIDS rates but few have mentioned one of the largest drivers of the disease — sexual violence against girls and young boys. All of the AIDS education in schools and billboard campaigns in the world will not effectively tackle the South African AIDS epidemic unless we create and support programs that honestly confront this national and international sorrow.

So whether it’s sex trafficking in Atlanta (see A Future Not a Past) or the stunning statistics on rape in South Africa, there is much to be done by individuals.  And progressive companies like M•A•C.


World Cup inspires seeing soccer/football as mechanism for social change.

Posted by lisa kays on June 11th, 2010

Yesterday, I got a Tweet from @Alyssa_Milano reminding me that, “Before the #WorldCup is won, 100k Africans will die from malaria.” She encouraged me to, “Join players & fans: http://bit.ly/WC_a_m6 #endmalaria.

The link clicks through to the United Nation’s “Unite Against Malaria” Facebook page.

This was quite timely, as the Tweet came through just as I was creating GlobalGiving’s World Cup landing page, featuring projects related to soccer.

Not long after, Tobias Eigen, President of Kabissa, an organization that bolsters civil society in Africa, sent out a message asking everyone what they were doing to leverage the World Cup in their awareness-raising and social change efforts in Africa.

Indeed, when it comes to this kind of thinking about how to leverage this year’s World Cup for good, it seems everyone is on the ball. (Pun intended, but with apologies nonetheless.)

It’s 10 a.m. on the day the World Cup is launching, and, in addition to those above, I’ve already seen Tweets or emails linking the World Cup to issues of global awareness and social action from @growingupglobal and even @usaid, and, of course, @peacecorpsconnect.

It’s fun and exciting to see an international sports platform being used in such creative, inventive ways to draw attention to issues which are less fun, but even more important than a soccer game, such as malaria, poverty alleviation, and HIV/AIDS.

The projects GlobalGiving is featuring on our World Cup landing page drive this home.

In just the sampling of projects we feature that tie to soccer, the issues being tackled include using soccer to help inmates in South African prisons reintegrate into society, reducing stigmas associated with amputees in Sierra Leone through amputee soccer, providing soccer as recreation for children in a refugee camp in Rafah, and using soccer as a means to build leadership and self-esteem for military daughters in the U.S.

Those are just a few of the ways that GlobalGiving projects are using soccer to create social change for people around the world. (Here’s the full list.)

We’re looking forward to seeing how the World Cup is used to fuel awareness of and support for projects and issues like these as much as we’re looking forward to the matches themselves.

And trust us, we’re really excited about the matches.

Symantec: Funding technology that’s fueling sustainable social change in South Africa

Posted by lisa kays on May 26th, 2010

In Guguletu, South Africa, a woman named Linda provides care for eight children who have no home of their own. Linda knows each of the children’s stories, ages, and names.

Except for one.

Linda can’t tell you the name of one of the girls, because she hasn’t spoken since arriving at Linda’s home with no documentation or other information. Though physically healthy, the child remains silent. Linda worries that she was previously literally locked up alone somewhere.

Here, in Linda’s home, the child is worried about with the care of any mother. Linda says, “What she needs is love and friends.”

To provide this kind of quality care to vulnerable children, Linda depends on Ikamva Labantu, an organization that provides social support to South Africa’s most vulnerable, with a special focus on children. Ikamva Labantu fosters success for school kids through innovative basketball and chess programs, as well as vocational skills training. They also focus on early learning and education programs in the formal and informal sectors.In addition, Ikamva Labantu supports families raising children orphaned by AIDS, fuels small businesses by providing start-up tools and training, and runs senior centers.

Symantec Corporation, a global leader in providing security, storage and systems management solutions to help consumers and organizations secure and manage their information-driven world, was so impressed by Ikamva Labantu that they awarded a grant to provide much-needed computers and IT support to bolster their work.

Symantec’s grant is part of their tailored, corporate philanthropic partnership with GlobalGiving, to support work in four focus areas: K-12 science, technology, engineering, and math education; women and minorities in engineering; environmental sustainability; and online safety.

Through the customized service provided through GlobalGiving, Symantec was able to provide a grant tailored to Ikamva Labantu’s needs, resulting in eight new computers, 11 upgraded computers, a new external hard drive, and a new color printer and 10 desktop printers.

With this gift, Symantec is investing in the sustainability of a proven, vetted organization, freeing up Ikamva Labantu to focus their resources on what they do best. 

Jovana Risovic, Ikamva Labantu’s fundraising manager, explains, “Symantec’s support will help us tremendously in achieving our goals and focusing our financial resources on the programs that assist hundreds of disadvantaged South Africans.”

Symantec and GlobalGiving invite you to build upon Symantec’s generous gift and fuel the tremendous work Ikamva Labantu is doing to change lives in South Africa.

Support Ikamva Labantu’s work.