Crowdsourcing Compassion from a Global Community

“The war in Liberia and the Ebola situation we are going through are enough to tell us what those people are going through.”  — Nelly Cooper, President, West Point Women for Health and Development

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After the devastating April 2015 earthquakes, Nepali communities are working to rebuild, and the GlobalGiving community has stepped up to respond with tremendous compassion. We’ve seen people giving from 111 countries around the world, including young children, grandparents, Nepali citizens, climbers who have summited Mt. Everest, and leading companies and their employees. Among this outpouring of generosity, one $200 donation and its accompanying message stood out to the GlobalGiving staff:

“We’re donating this money because we know what it is like to be in a situation like the one the people of Nepal find themselves in.  Many of us were so devastated during the war in Liberia; we lost everything, even loved ones. Now looking at what we saw on TV and on the internet about Nepal, really motivated us to help with the little we are able to give right now.”

The donation was sent by the grassroots nonprofit West Point Women for Health and Development, a GlobalGiving partner working in the Liberian capital of Monrovia.  Over the past year, Nelly Cooper, the organization’s president, and the West Point Women have played a vital role in the frontline fight against Ebola. Many volunteered to lead community education and advocacy efforts during the epidemic’s height, even as their own families were affected by the disease. The West Point Women have helped Liberia become Ebola-free, and they have a unique understanding of how such crises impact communities in the near and long terms.

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The West Point Women for Health and Development volunteer team were at the front lines in the fight against Ebola

You, as part of the GlobalGiving community, have played an important role, too. The work of the West Point Women has been funded, in part, by donations to GlobalGiving’s Ebola Epidemic Relief Fund. We’re so touched by their own generosity and desire to ‘pay it forward’ to other GlobalGiving partners.

This isn’t the first time that nonprofits in the GlobalGiving community have supported one another from across the world during times of need: New Orleans-based Tipitina’s Foundation is dedicated to helping at-risk youth access musical instruments and education. In March 2011, Tipitina used funds they had raised for their own program to purchase instruments for programs working with Japanese youth impacted by the tsunami. Noted Kim Katner, Managing Director of Tipitina’s Foundation, “I personally know that I would not have made it through the aftermath of Katrina if it wasn’t for music.”

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After the 2011earthquake and tsunami in Japan, kids from Tipitina used money they’d raised to buy their own instruments to send Instruments to Bright Kids Music Club of the Tagajo-Higashi Elementary School

Most recently, a team of Japanese and Korean volunteers, affected by their own local crises (the 2011 tsunami and 2014 ferry disaster, respectively), traveled to Nepal to build temporary shelters with IsraAID. The volunteers are also providing psychosocial support to earthquake survivors and sharing their own personal experiences with recovery and rebuilding.

“When we created GlobalGiving, we knew that nonprofits in our community would benefit from sharing ideas, information, and connections. But we never imagined that we’d see the community come together in this way, with Ebola survivors in Liberia or tsunami survivors from Korea demonstrating such generosity to earthquake survivors a half a world away,” said Mari Kuraishi, GlobalGiving co-founder and president.  “With GlobalGiving, it’s possible for anyone in the world to make a meaningful, positive difference, especially after a tragedy.”

Special thanks to Menaka Chandurkar for her collaboration on this article. 

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