celebrating 10 lessons learned over 10 years – love at first click

Posted by Kevin Conroy on May 16th, 2012

Ten years ago, Co-Founders Mari Kuraishi and Dennis Whittle launched GlobalGiving. In honor of these past ten years and in the spirit of one of our guiding core values, ‘Listen. Act. Learn. Repeat,’ we have launched a monthly blog series guest-written by former and current staff members. Each will speak candidly about their experience at GlobalGiving and offer up something that they have learned. Mari wrote our inaugural blog post in February, and this month, our Director of User Experience and Product Development, Kevin Conroytalks about his learning while working at GlobalGiving…

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A little over five years ago I was working for a large, multinational consulting firm. I had a good job with a steady paycheck and incredible view from my 38th floor office. However, I wasn’t satisfied. I felt like I could be doing so much more with my skills. My wife suggested that I look for a nonprofit job.

I scoffed at her idea. The nonprofit world? I loved the idea of doing good, but didn’t think that my programming abilities would be of much use in the nonprofit world. You can’t code a new water well in Africa. Fixing bugs doesn’t help a poor child in India go to school. And planning a software project timeline certainly doesn’t address underlying societal and economic issues that created these conditions in the first place.

Despite these rational objections, my wife wouldn’t take no for an answer. She walked me to the computer and looked over my shoulder as I went to Idealist.org, typed “programming” into the box and skeptically clicked “search”.

The first result was for some nonprofit in Washington D.C. called the GlobalGiving Foundation. I clicked on the website and after about 30 seconds of browsing I turned to my wife and said: “This website is horrible. I have to work here.”

It was love at first click.

Kevin Conroy, Director of User Experience and Product Development

I could see from the website that GlobalGiving was doing amazing, innovative things to help small, grassroots nonprofits around the world. But they needed help. The outdated website used at the time needed to be better, faster, stronger. It needed to highlight  the incredible work that the grassroots projects were doing. It needed to let people easily search for a cause that the cared about. It needed to tell the heartwarming updates of change and deep social impact that was being made. And it needed to have a way for the people benefiting from the projects to have a voice and tell their stories.

I applied and when I went to the interview I was thrilled to discover that everyone at GlobalGiving already shared this vision. They saw GlobalGiving as more than just a website – it’s a platform for creating, discovering, and learning about social change. They wanted it to become a place for donors to find incredible projects and for people in communities anywhere in the world to join together to address the problems that they’re facing without waiting for the government to step in.

Needless to say, I accepted the job offer.

Five years later I’m pleased to say that with the help of my incredible co-workers we’ve fixed all of the problems on the site that I saw on that first click and have improved it in ways that I didn’t think were possible then. We’ve gone from helping a few hundred nonprofits at the time to helping more than 5,000 grassroots projects in 140+ countries.

My code may not build a well, but it can help the communities in Africa that need clean water get the funds that they need to build one. Fixing bugs won’t send a child to school, but it makes sure that tens of thousands of people can support projects that do. My project plans don’t even attempt to address the underlying, systemic problems of poverty, but we have planned and built tools that let people tell us the stories of the problems facing their communities, and from that, people have been able to create new programs and projects that address some of these underlying problems.

For me, the most important thing that I’ve learned these last five years isn’t stored in a source control tool, a binary executable, or even a database. It’s in the passion of my coworkers, our project partners, and our donors. No one is content to settle for the status quo. We are all passionate about improving our website, our projects, our organizations, and ultimately the world. No matter how much room for improvement we still have, it’s our ‘never settle’ attitude that created ‘love at first click’ for me, and is the most important thing that I’ve learned.

-Kevin Conroy

PS: If you’re a programmer looking for a way to make a bigger impact in the world with your skills, check out the nonprofit world. There’s a lot more going on than you’d think. If you’re interested, drop me a line. And if you’re interested in other opportunities, here are some amazing jobs from our friends at DonorsChoose and Kiva, plus many more on Idealist.org.

 

One Response to “celebrating 10 lessons learned over 10 years – love at first click”

  1. Claire Lyons says:

    Kevin!
    “Never Settle” – Love this ethos/ethic.
    BIG thanks for your insights & contributions.
    Claire