GlobalGiving Reduces Fee to As Low As 5%

GlobalGiving is not just a platform. GlobalGiving is...GlobalGiving has never been just a crowdfunding platform. Sure, we provide a great website that helps nonprofits tell their stories and collect donations. But that’s just the beginning. As a nonprofit ourselves, we offer a host of services, including vetting, tools, training, one-on-one support, as well as access to corporate funding and new donors. Our ultimate aim is to help nonprofits gain access to the resources they need to thrive.

We’re a partner, not just a platform.

For 15 years, we’ve been building out a successful model that supports and rewards locally-led organizations that emphasize learning and effectiveness. We want to continue to grow by opening our community to even more community- and world- changers. And to prove that bottom-up development not only works, but is possible on a larger scale.

In order to support even more nonprofits of all sizes, we’re reducing our fees for most types of donations. Starting October 1, 2017, once an organization has met our initial fundraising threshold, GlobalGiving will retain just 5% of funds directed to US- and UK-based nonprofits, and 7% of funds for all other organizations. Donations will also still be subject to a 3% third party transaction processing fee, and certain types of donations which rely on expanded GlobalGiving staff and services or have been pre-negotiated are ineligible for the new fee.

Unlike other fundraising platforms, GlobalGiving drives funding back to nonprofits in the form of matching money, bonus prizes, marketing campaigns, and corporate partnerships. In 2016 alone, we drove nearly $10 million extra to our 3,000+ partners, 99% of which received a portion of that funding!

We’ll still provide all the same high quality services and support and, most importantly, we’ll continue to Listen, Act, Learn. Repeat as we elevate local voices and direct support to the most effective nonprofits around the world.

Introducing GlobalGiving Learn: A Resource For Nonprofits, Donors, And Companies

Girls interacting with a computer

GlobalGiving is thrilled to announce a new growing collection of resources to help you create more good in the world. Funded in part by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and featuring content sourced from our innovative community, GlobalGiving.org’s new Learn library is full of free tips, tools, and resources for nonprofits, donors, and companies.

On Learn, you’ll find stories about successes and failures. You’ll find wisdom and inspiration from your peers on topics that you care about, including fundraising, technology, marketing, and nonprofit management. Best of all, you’re invited to contribute your own learning to help others grow and become more effective!

Here’s a look at six features you’ll love on GlobalGiving’s Learn:

1. Tools + Downloads
Save time with this collection of free, downloadable resources for nonprofits, including a budgeting template, fundraising calendar, and sample press release. Explore now.

2. Success Stories
A cyclist who battled steep mountain passes to raise money for survivors of a deadly earthquake in Italy. A company that helped a chimp escape his fate in the illegal meat trade. A group of women artisans who mastered crowdfunding to take their goods beyond the Sacred Valley of Peru. You inspire us every day! Now there’s a dedicated place to shout about your earth-changing generosity, passion, and ideas. Explore now.

3. GG Test Lab
GlobalGiving is committed to testing theories in aid and philanthropy, so our partners can focus on feeding the hungry, building houses, and hundreds of other amazing things. Check our Test Lab for the latest learnings from around the world (like what Gram Vikas Trust learned from a simple, three-question survey of girls with new bicycles). Explore now.

4. Ideas + Insights
Learn more about topics that matter to nonprofits, companies, and donors in 165+ countries around the world—from myths about millennial donors to the newest research in employee engagement. Explore now.

5. Videos
Visit our video library to find short webinars on fundraising, social media, marketing, and more. You’ll find fun stuff, too—like this TEDx video where our co-founder admits he failed before he finally understood philanthropy’s missing piece. Explore now.

6. Giving Tips
Whether you are a first-time donor, veteran grantmaker, or budding corporate philanthropist, giving to local projects anywhere in the world should be fun, safe, and easy. That’s why we’re rounding up tips for people who want to make the world a better place, including a growing collection of resources for and from our corporate partners. Explore now.

You don’t have to bookmark the webpage to take advantage of this great resource. Sign up to get the best of Learn in your inbox (about once a month)!

Forget the Growth Hacks: 3 Tips for Startups to Get ROI from their CSR

Team Brainstorming at a Breather Space

Do you think your company is too young, scrappy, and hungry to allow for the luxury of “do gooder” programs? It is an unfortunately common misconception that social responsibility activities should wait until your company or product is at least generating sustainable revenue. After all, that early capital is for plain old growth, right?

Maybe not. In fact, the case is quite the opposite.

Though effective methods of measurement are still debated, there is some solid evidence emerging (for example, from researchers at Kellogg) that suggests companies that invest in social responsibility tend to perform better financially.

This starts with your employees—especially your millennial employees. A recent study by Cone Communication found that 62% are willing to take a pay cut to work for a responsible company. Plus, positively engaged employees tend to stay longer and are more productive, leading to additional cost-savings.

A similar story is true for your customers—especially your Millennial customers. This consumer generation is expected to spend $200 billion a year by 2017. Where will that spending power go? Brands and companies that take social responsibility seriously, we hope. More than 9 in 10 Millennials would switch brands to one associated with a cause.

Sustainability isn’t just how you package things; it is about more effective and efficient employees, more loyal and engaged customers, and better financial performance overall.

You don’t need a corporate foundation—or even dedicated resources to do this well. Cause marketing can be an effective, low-cost activity for early-stage companies, or as part of new product launches, to propel a social responsibility strategy.

Here are 3 things all startups should consider in their approach to corporate social responsibility.

1. Seek strategic partners, not vendors
Breather is a great example of a hot startup taking this to heart.

Called the “Uber for private workspaces,” Breather lets you unlock private spaces on-the-go and on-demand where you can work, meet, and relax. The company recently closed another round of funding, and rather than employing some growth hack like discounted prices this holiday season, Breather is donating $50 through GlobalGiving for every full-day reservation through January 15th.

For their cause marketing, Breather sought a partner like GlobalGiving as opposed to just a vendor. We collaborated to develop a co-branded landing page and a larger promotional strategy for social media.

The end result of a partnership tends to be more impactful and effective because both parties have an opportunity to add value; in this case, the campaign benefits from promotion through both GlobalGiving’s and Breather’s networks.

2. Match brand with cause
One of Breather’s primary causes for this campaign is homelessness. They are directing donations through GlobalGiving to a project of United Planning Organization called “Help UPO Help the DC Homeless” and a project of Latin American Youth Center called “Help 100 Youth Exit Homelessness in Washington, DC”. It makes sense given Breather is a company that provides access to safe and secure physical spaces. A strong parallel between your brand and your chosen cause is vital for the success of the campaign. In a study by BrandStar, 65% of consumers are unable to make sense of a business’s or brand’s social responsibility programs. A close coupling of brand and cause will make it easier for your audience to understand your values and therefore more willing to engage.

3. Measure to learn
Made possible by the co-branded landing page, Breather is using tracking links to monitor where users come from and where they go. This provides an opportunity to establish evidence that the campaign was effective—that it inspired people to use Breather for a meeting space because it would also help at-risk populations. But the important thing here is not to measure just to publish the results; instead, measure for the sake of feedback so your next cause marketing campaign will be data-driven and more effective. (We call this, “Listen, act, learn. Repeat.”)

Breather is just one example of great, early-stage companies or new product launches GlobalGiving has worked with to power low-overhead, meaningful customer engagement.

For more information on Breather, email washingtonDC@breather.com.

Interoperability Judo in the Aid Sector

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Photo Courtesy of Yayasan Damai Olahraga Bali

Ten years ago I nearly set an Italian hotel on fire. I’d plugged an American fan into a European electrical socket, and after about 30 seconds I had a shower of sparks landing on the curtains. What I’d forgotten to account for, of course, was the difference between the 120 volt standard that the fan was expecting and the 240 volts that the outlet was producing. Just because the connection worked physically didn’t mean it would work practically. Contrast this with last month, when I’d brought my laptop and charger on a trip to India but again forgot a power converter. Thankfully, Apple has an elegant solution to the problem of different electrical standards. Rather than trying to convince every country to use the same voltage in its wall sockets, they’ve just built a charger that can handle a range of inputs. They accept the complexity that happens when large groups of people try to collaborate and work with it, not against it. They’ve taken an obstacle and turned it into an opportunity. It’s design judo.

When it comes to financial flows in the aid sector, standards are more complicated than deciding what plug to use. With so many governments, organizations, and companies sending billions of dollars to support global development, communicating the details of these relationships and transactions in a shared framework becomes a herculean task. The International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI) has made progress in establishing a standard for the sector to describe funding and implementing relationships consistently. The list of 480+ entities that publish IATI-compliant data understates the standard’s reach. Most of the 29 member countries of the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) report IATI data about their aid spending, and the funds sent by these governments represent about 95% of total DAC expenditures. It’s hard to estimate an exact number, but it’s safe to say that the IATI standard describes a significant majority of the world’s aid dollars.

Still, there are some challenges to using IATI-compliant data to get a precise understanding of how the aid sector is actually organized. Despite IATI’s thoroughness, organizations still interpret the requirements differently, leading to the same data fields containing multiple types of information. This can make seemingly simple tasks, like identifying a unique organization consistently, very difficult in practice. Similarly, there aren’t strict validations or requirements preventing organizations from omitting data or inadvertently hiding important outcome data in a pages-long list of transactions. Organizations that don’t share their data are left out entirely, even if they’re mentioned frequently by organizations that do report. All this can make it hard for aid professionals like funders, program implementers, or researchers to extract useful conclusions from IATI data.

So what should the sector do about this? One approach might be to double-down on the rules associated with our data standards and try to force everyone to provide clear, accessible, and organized data. This would be similar to convincing all countries to share the same voltage standard; it’s not a practical option. The alternative is the judo method: work with the challenges inherent in the IATI standard instead of trying to regulate them away. Some friends and I recently tried to do just that as our capstone project for the UC Berkeley Masters of Information and Data Science degree.

The end result is AidSight, a platform that provides easy-to-use tools for the aid sector to search IATI data, explore relationships between organizations (including those that don’t report their data directly), and validate the likely usefulness of their results. For example, imagine you’re an aid agency that needs to report on the current state of the water sector in Ghana. First, AidSight enables you to query all IATI data in plain english instead of a complex requiring search interface or a code-heavy API call. Your results appear as network diagram that maps the relationships between the organizations that meet your search criteria, whether they report to the IATI standard or not. Here’s our result for the Ghanian water sector – note that we’re mapping the just the organizations and relationships, not their real-world locations or relative sizes:

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The green dots represent organizations that report data to IATI directly, the red dots are organizations that are implied in the data that other organizations report, and the width of the lines connecting them indicates the strength of the relationship. This approach takes the data reported by 484 organizations and turns it into results for tens of thousands. In this example, there are two “hubs” of reporting organizations on the right side of the map that work with 5-7 non-reporting organizations at varying levels of connection. In contrast, there’s another hub organization (GlobalGiving itself) towards the bottom left that works with many more organizations, but in the same way with all of them. Using this method, users are quickly able to spot the key players in any sector and explore the strength of their collaborations instantly.

Understanding these connections is important, but what if the report needs more granular results? Before downloading and analyzing the raw data, you’d want to know if you’re likely to be able to draw meaningful conclusions from the results we’ve found. To make this easy, AidSight contains a data quality dashboard that uses heuristics to estimate how useful each organization’s data is likely to be and summarizes it with a simple letter grade.

Example AidSight Data Quality Dashboard

Now, anyone at an aid agency can measure IATI data quality with a few clicks and save their data science teams to focus on only the most useful datasets. We can also use this approach to establish valuable benchmarks for the aid sector as a whole. The average grade of C- suggests that there’s lots to be done to improve the quality of development data reporting, but having a framework to measure progress makes it possible to consider how we might get there.

Currently, AidSight is a minimum viable product, so there are many improvements to make. Still, solutions that focus on data interoperability without trying to fight the natural complexity of the aid sector represent exciting opportunities for us to bring enhanced accessibility and understanding to our work in a democratic way. Taking the judo approach to development data means that a growing number of inventive, creative, and driven users will be able to discover new solutions to the aid world’s challenges.


Special thanks to the other members of the AidSight team: Natarajan Krishnaswami, Minhchau Dang, and Glenn Dunmire, as well as Marc Maxmeister for his feedback on this work. Explore IATI data yourself at aidsight.org or download the open source code on Github.

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to #MatchAMillion dollars on #GivingTuesday!

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will #MatchAMillion with GlobalGiving on #GivingTuesday! All donations matched at 50% up to $1,000 per donor per organization while matching funds last.

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will #MatchAMillion with GlobalGiving on #GivingTuesday! All donations matched at 50% up to $1,000 per donor per organization while matching funds last.

Big news! The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has generously offered to match $1 million in donations on GlobalGiving this #GivingTuesday! Beginning at 00:00:01 EST on Tuesday, November 29, 2016, all donations on GlobalGiving.org will be matched at 50% (up to $1,000 per donor, per nonprofit) while the #MatchAMillion funds last. (Full details here.)

Join the Movement!
After Thanksgiving (in the U.S.), following Black Friday and Cyber Monday, #GivingTuesday is a global movement that kicks off the giving season with charity and gratitude. Since 2012 #GivingTuesday has engaged hundreds of thousands of donors giving to tens of thousands of nonprofits. Whole Whale predicts that donors will give a collective $200 million or more on #GivingTuesday this year!

Don’t Miss Out!
This is an opportunity to increase your impact on one of thousands of earth-changing projects around the globe on #GivingTuesday. Whether you’re passionate about supporting Syrian Refugees or protecting the environment, all donations on GlobalGiving are tax-deductible for U.S. donors. Take a moment to consider your end-of-year giving goals now, and set a calendar reminder for early on November 29 so your donations will be matched!

Spread the Word!
Help us get the word out about the biggest matching opportunity ever available on GlobalGiving! Share this post on social media, or write your own post linking to your favorite project!

This #GivingTuesday, @GlobalGiving & @gatesfoundation will #MatchAMillion in donations to projects in 160 countries! http://bit.ly/matchamillion