New Infographic: GlobalGiving’s Bet on Improving Nonprofit Effectiveness

Posted by Alison Carlman on September 16th, 2014
Click to read about the impact GlobalGiving has in the world

Click to read about the impact GlobalGiving has in the world

You may be familiar with GlobalGiving as a way to help nonprofits raise funds from individual donors and progressive companies. But that’s only part of our mission. Our mission is to catalyze a marketplace for information, ideas and money, helping nonprofits access not only critical funding, but also critical tools and knowledge so that you can be as effective as possible with the resources you do have.

What do we mean by effectiveness? Well here’s what we’ve seen: whether in business, government or the nonprofit sector, the world’s most agile and adaptable organizations are learning organizations. They’re engaged in a continuous Cycle of Progress: listening, acting, learning, and repeating. (Sound a little like a core value you might have heard from us before?) These organizations are constantly honing what they do based on the best information they can get their hands on.

Check out our new infographic. that explains how we can make sure every dollar you contribute will have the highest impact possible, by helping you channel it toward the most agile and adaptive organizations in the areas that are most important to you.  

GlobalGiving to Hold Its First Summit on Social Media & Online Giving July 1-2, 2014 in New Delhi, India

Posted by Alison Carlman on June 11th, 2014

(WASHINGTON, DC), June 10, 2014 – GlobalGiving, the organization behind charitable giving websites GlobalGiving.org and GlobalGiving.co.uk, will hold its Summit on Social Media & Online Giving on July 1-2, 2014 in New Delhi, India. The Summit is produced in partnership with Social Media for Nonprofits, the premiere global event series on social media for social good.

The first-ever, two-day in-person event from GlobalGiving will bring together representatives from global technology services and leading South Asian NGOs to share insights, trends, and best practices for effectively engaging supporters and donors online. Fundraisers, executive directors, program managers, and communications staff from more than 100 organizations are expected to attend.

Confirmed speakers at the 2104 Summit on Social Media & Online Giving include:

India’s NGO community plays a large and active role in social change in India and around the world. More than 120 Indian organizations are actively fundraising on the website and more and more organizations are joining GlobalGiving every year. The 2014 Summit on Social Media & Online Giving is an opportunity to provide hands-on training to GlobalGiving’s existing partners and to introduce GlobalGiving to organizations that are interested in the fundraising platform. GlobalGiving is excited to host its first event of this kind in New Delhi.

“India’s NGO community already has the passion, creativity and people to tackle the extraordinary needs of its local communities, “ said GlobalGiving’s Chief Program Officer John Hecklinger. “With this Summit we’re bringing some of the best online tools and smartest practices into the mix.”

Since it was founded in 2002, GlobalGiving has enabled more than 4,000 nonprofit organizations to access technology, training, and visibility to raise funds for more than 9,000 projects in 144 countries. In January, the Washington, DC-based organization announced it had reached $100 million in total donations providing through its platform.

The event will take place at Habitat World at the India Habitat Centre. Staff from GlobalGiving partner NGOs and other nonprofit organizations are encouraged to attend. Regular registration is Rs. 4,500 with discounts provided to organizations that are members of GlobalGiving.

The 2014 Summit on Social Media & Online Giving is generously sponsored by the Ford Motor Company Fund.

For more information about the 2014 Summit on Social Media & Online Giving, visit:
www.globalgiving.org/summit-2014/

For more information about GlobalGiving, visit:
http://www.globalgiving.org/

About GlobalGiving

GlobalGiving is a registered nonprofit organization with the mission of catalyzing a global market for ideas, information, and money that democratizes aid and philanthropy. Its online fundraising platform, GlobalGiving.org, is creating new possibilities for everyday philanthropists, effective nonprofits, and innovative companies around the world.

About Social Media for Nonprofits

Social Media for Nonprofits is a nonprofit committed to providing nonprofits quality and accessible education on leveraging the power of social media for social good. We are the only series in the world dedicated to Social Media for Social Change. We provide capacity building training to nonprofits in this area with programs focused on fundraising, awareness, and advocacy.

Local or Global. You choose.

Posted by Donna Callejon on June 10th, 2014
Every CSR professional knows that securing company resources and operational support can be challenging at times. In addition, most employee engagement professionals are juggling many roles, so managing multiple philanthropic partners can be a challenge. But when you’re a 300,000+ employee company with a footprint in more than a hundred countries, you strive to provide your employees with programs that are as equitable and engaging as possible, while of course minimizing the time and expense necessary to administer them. That’s why we are very excited to have launched a first-of-its-kind program that simultaneously simplifies and expands employee engagement/giving opportunities with long-time GlobalGiving partner HP. Together we’ll streamline operations as they drive Living Progress and, more importantly, provide a robust and unified experience for employees worldwide.For several years HP has been working with both Network for Good and GlobalGiving to provide its employees who volunteer with charitable gift cards as rewards. US-based employees received Good Cards, redeemable to any US 501(c)(3) on the Network for Good platform.  Employee volunteers outside the US received GlobalGiving gift cards, redeemable for any program on the GlobalGiving website, including thousands of internationally-based organizations’ programs.

This, of course, required HP’s social innovation team to manage relationships with both partners. It also meant that reporting was coming from two different sources in different formats and had to be integrated by HP staff.

It’s so much easier now! Here’s why:

  • Employees can give directly to these nonprofits in more than 140 countries, thanks to the Guidestar and Network for Good (“NFG”) APIs and NFG’s tested US disbursement capabilities. The giving experience is now truly global.

We are already learning from this partnership and can’t wait to work with other companies looking for a cost-effective, co-branded, and unique giving experience.  Let us know if you’d like to be a part of the next collaboration: dcallejon@globalgivng.org.

Pursue Purpose Through New Power

Posted by Angela Wu on May 22nd, 2014

Jeremy Heimans at CECP 2014 Summit: What Counts


Imagine you’re eleven. You live in Rio. You absolutely love school. It’s a safe place where you are free to learn, engage with your peers, and grow. But suddenly you hear about plans to demolish the school building. In its place will be a parking lot for a local stadium.

What do you do?

In a perpetually evolving world, it’s necessary to be mindful that the way we approach change may need to adapt. Now more than ever, we’re equipped with tools and technology to tackle problem-solving with innovation, creativity, and efficiency.

Jeremy Heimans, Co-Founder and CEO of Purpose, activates individuals to build lasting social movements that address global issues. Recognizing the shift of power structures—from what he calls “old power” to “new power”—his organization utilizes technology to empower activists, amplify their voices, and mobilize the masses to make positive change happen.

Old power works like a currency and is held by few. It commands, is leader-driven, and closed. New power moves like a current and is enabled by many. It is shared, peer-driven, and open.

In a talk titled “Unlocking New Power: How to Think Like a Movement-Builder,” Heimans encouraged the companies at CECP 2014 Summit: What Counts to pursue purpose through new power.

As evidenced through successful movements such as Airbnb, Kickstarter, and Giving Tuesday, which disrupt traditional top-down power models, new power considers participation and collaboration as ends in themselves and offers its participants transparency into the process of change. Anybody can take action, and the sky is the limit when large groups of people band together in solidarity to drive positive change.

If your company is looking to harness new power or adapt from old power, the key is to find a cause that aligns with your business model. If purpose is already built into your brand, then organize the masses around that mission. If not, Heimans advises to keep the following points in mind:

  • Think like a movement builder, not a philanthropist.
  • Invite participants into your story.
  • If you’re not there yet, avoid declaring victory.
  • The stakes must be high.
  • Be in it for the long-term or not at all.


Now what if I told you the eleven-year-old is a real girl named Bia? To protect her school, she started a campaign with Meu Rio, an organization that set up a 24/7 live webcam on the school. Community members monitored activity, and when bulldozers showed up at the school, all who signed up received a text message and gathered to form a human barrier around the building. In the end, government officials agreed to have the school remain in place.

Unparalleled potential is found in fueling forces that create long-term social value through authentic, community-driven movements. This echoes one of our core values at GlobalGiving, which declares that we’re “Always Open.” We believe in the power of great ideas, which can come from anyone, anywhere, at anytime.

Build for Bia, urged Heimans. We at GlobalGiving couldn’t agree more.

A Full Circle of Giving

Posted by Donna Callejon on March 28th, 2014

VMwareInspirationBoothPiDay2014GlobalGiving recently joined the VMware Foundation at its Palo Alto headquarters to celebrate Pi Day by sharing ways that we can all support our global community. On the day marked by 3.14—and the joys of calculating the circumference of a circle—it was a reminder to us about the full circle of giving: the giving and receiving that helps propel our mission. We see this full circle exemplified by our continued collaboration with the VMware Foundation.

The VMware Foundation believes in Citizen Philanthropy, in which every individual’s actions matter and add up to our collective impact. In recognition of all the individual contributions its employees made that contributed to the company’s collective success in 2013, the Foundation gave the gift of giving to its more than 14,000 employees worldwide as a holiday gift in 2013. Each employee received a GlobalGiving charitable donation gift card for US$100, which they could then direct to projects of their choosing on GlobalGiving.org.

The cycle of giving continued with VMware employees directing their support to charitable programs of more than 1,000 organizations in 120 countries with their holiday gift cards. While many organizations received these gifts, for several the unanticipated support was quite a holiday surprise that will contribute to their missions and work in the year ahead.

More than 400 employees collectively donated $36,000 to Give an Hour, an organization that can now provide 2,000+ additional hours of mental health services to members of military families across the United States such as Jennifer Crane. Jennifer returned from her tour in Afghanistan with post-traumatic stress and found herself homeless and struggling with flashbacks and nightmares. When her course of treatment with Give an Hour ended, she reflected, “I no longer feel broken, but instead I feel whole. I am not trying to fool myself because yes, every day is a struggle. But the generosity of the individuals involved with Give an Hour has given me the faith in society that I so desperately needed.”

Thousands of miles away from VMware’s headquarters in Palo Alto, California, a woman named Nissima gave birth to twins in India. Her son weighed 1.5 kg, and her daughter just 0.73 kg. She rushed them to a nearby public hospital that had an on-site Embrace program and 21 infant warmers, but before she made it there, her son passed away.

Hypothermia is rarely a cause for concern across the birthing wings of the developed world, but in resource-challenged India it is a primary contributor to newborn deaths – and it is preventable. “Embrace is helping to reduce the risk of death in preterm babies in India. We establish programs at under-resourced clinics and hospitals and donate the Embrace infant warmer for free to low birth weight and premature infants in need,” explains Alejandra Villalobos, Director of Development at Embrace.

When they arrived at the hospital, Nissima’s daughter was immediately placed inside a warmer and Embrace staff gave Nissima support, explained what hypothermia was, and taught her the skills to keep her baby daughter warm. Villalobos considers education a key component of the Embrace strategy. “Recognizing that technology alone is not enough to solve complex problems like neonatal hypothermia, we also hire local staff to provide intensive health education programs for mothers, families, and health care workers.” The Embrace staff followed up three months later to find Nissima practicing the skills she had learned and her daughter, now named Fortunate, growing every day.

Embrace has developed a simple solution to a life threatening problem, and with the support of the VMware Foundation and 721 VMware employees, is on its way to providing the life-saving technology of an Embrace warmer to more than 150,000 low birth weight and premature infants in 2014. “The Embrace team is humbled and honored to receive VMware and GlobalGiving’s support. We were overwhelmed by the generosity of VMware employees during the holidayssaid Villalobos.

For Jean, a Technical Account Manager at VMware, the hardest part of giving was choosing which worthy project to support. After giving to Embrace he noted that he actually received a great deal in return. “I felt so great and so happy just knowing that I helped someone in the world,” he said. All donors on the site can feel confident their money is being sent to credible organizations with proven track records due to GlobalGiving’s thorough vetting process. Jean felt the program opened his eyes to problems around the world and motivated him to create a better place to live.

GlobalGiving is proud to collaborate with VMware as we work together to continue the full circle of giving and receiving that has the power to impact, and potentially change, all of our lives.

Happy Money

Posted by Alison Carlman on October 18th, 2013
Happy Money: The Science of Smarter Spending - Book

The Science of Smarter Spending – Book

If you think money can’t buy happiness, think again. In their new book Happy Money, our friend Michael Norton and his fellow behavioral scientist Elizabeth Dunn, explain how money really can buy happiness – if you follow five core principles of smarter spending.

One of the principles should come as no surprise to all you GlobalGivers: spending money on others can increase your happiness even more than spending your cash on yourself.

It’s not just a warm fuzzy feeling. It’s science. Click here to see the book or read more in this Economist article.

Virtual Community, Actual Impact

Posted by Donna Callejon on June 4th, 2013

Paul was a teenager when he was drafted into the United States (US) Army during the Vietnam War.  And when the US ended its military involvement in Vietnam, it was just the beginning of a longer battle for him.  He was later deployed to multiple other international posts, and when he finally returned home, he was left with little support and undiagnosed Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).  The disorder wreaked havoc on his life, leaving him homeless, unemployed, over-medicated, and depressed.

Today, with the help of Canines with a Cause (CWAC) and the generous donations of VMware employees all over the world, Paul has a second chance.  CWAC carefully partners veterans with the life-saving companionship of rescued shelter dogs.

“Many with PTSD remain hyper-vigilant, suffer from nightmares, and have difficulty sleeping.  The dogs give them a sense of security so they can sleep well,” explains CWAC founder Cathy King.  “When veterans have an anxiety or panic attack, we train the dogs to paw or bark at them, bringing them back to the present and not somewhere dangerous in their minds.”

photo courtesy of canines with a cause

photo courtesy of canines with a cause

More than four million healthy, adoptable animals are euthanized in shelters each year.  One in four war veterans will come home with PTSD.  The CWAC program prides itself on being able to save two lives at once — it helps both Paul and his former shelter dog reconnect with society.  “He has responsibility and purpose now,” says Paul’s friend.  “Through the CWAC program, he thinks he’s training the dog but really, he’s retraining himself.”

The VMware Foundation partners with the GlobalGiving Foundation to support the work of CWAC through its ‘Citizen Philanthropy’ approach to giving.  The VMware Foundation provides a platform for its more than 13,000 employees worldwide, enabling each employee to amplify his/her contributions to the community. One way VMware supports employee-led giving is through its Milestone Awards. Celebrating service with VMware, people receive charitable donation gift cards when they join the company and when they reach their 1-year anniversary. VMware people can direct the donations to a GlobalGiving charitable project that’s close to their hearts.

Gail Gilstrap, a VMware Engagement Manager based in the Washington, DC, area recently celebrated her 1-year anniversary with VMware. Gilstrap explains how the company has supported her charitable interests.

“There were a lot of organizations to choose from but I gave to CWAC because animals have always been close to my heart and my daughter is studying to be a veterinary technician.  A lot of my family has also served in the military so I thought, ‘what better way to support?’”

Another employee, Priya Kornalius, recently joined VMware as an IT Change Manager in Bangalore, India.  On her first day, she received a GlobalGiving gift card as a welcome gift from the VMware Foundation

“I was pleasantly surprised by the GlobalGiving gift card at first but, really, it has set my expectations for VMware — it’s a company that values people and giving back to communities in need,” says Priya.

“I’m from a small village in India and I’ve seen so many children who don’t have enough money for a better education,” Priya continues, “It was such a joy to donate to help schoolchildren in the Sundarbans (India).”

The Sundarbans is a remote delta region located partially in West Bengal, India.  About 80% of rural households in this state are not electrified.  This limits economic opportunity in the region and consequently, a high proportion of its dense population lives below the poverty line.

For schoolchildren, the lack of electricity means that at nightfall, it becomes simply too dark to study.  Kerosene lanterns are sometimes available but they are expensive, release dangerous smoke and fumes, and frequently cause fire accidents.

Priya used her VMware GlobalGiving gift card to provide solar lamps to children and classrooms in the Sundarbans.  The Indian non-profit organization, the Association for Social and Environmental Development (ASED), leads this initiative and has received more than US$12,760 from VMware employee Milestone Awards

Fourteen year-old Kakoli Giri received an ASED solar lamp in April 2012.

She comes from a family whose monthly income is just 2000 Indian rupees (US$37).  They practice subsistence farming and her father migrates seasonally in search of daily-wage work in Kolkata, the capital of West Bengal.

Kakoli is currently in the ninth grade and her favorite subjects are physical science and geography.  In the evenings, she uses the solar lamp to study.  She attends tutorial three times a week and during this time, her younger brother is able to use the solar lamp for his own studies.  Since receiving the lamp a year ago, Kakoli’s grades have improved and she has moved from 39th to 33rd in her class.

“GlobalGiving has been a wonderful partner,” says ASED project leader Diti Mookherjee.  “Together we are securing brighter futures for needy children.”

 

VM Ware Employees Share on VMLink, the company's internal social network

VMWare Employees Share on VMLink, the company’s internal social network

 

VMware continues to support the personal charitable interests of its employees.  To date, more than US$170,000 has been donated to more than 1100 projects in more than 100 countries throughout the world by VMware people starting their journey with VMware and those marking their 1-year anniversary through giving back to the broader community.

How they won: American Open Challenge Winner says “crowd-sourcing was the key to our success”

Posted by Marc Maxson on February 13th, 2013

Jared Schwartz of Frogloop (a nonprofit online marketing blog) interviewed the guys from Critical Exposure and have some excellent advice for nonprofits trying to succeed on GlobalGiving:

http://www.frogloop.com/care2blog/2009/9/7/how-a-small-nonprofit-used-social-media-crowd-sourcing-to-wi.html 

The goal was simple. Earn a permanent spot on the GlobalGiving website by raising at least $4000 online from 50 individual donors in three weeks. Win up to $6000 in additional bonuses for out-fundraising the 70 other participating organizations.

The challenge was daunting. How does Critical Exposure, a little non-profit with a small group of supporters raise more money than the dozens of other participating organizations, many of whom have a large, established fundraising base?

The answer was clear. Use an array of social media channels — including Twitter, Facebook and crowd-sourcing to turn our small group of tech savvy supporters into a powerful fundraising force.

What Critical Exposure Did

A Plan of Attack – The first step Critical Exposure took was to lay out a three-week communications plan, then we threw the entire thing out. Well, not really. As the competition heated up, we certainly had to adapt, but having an overall strategic plan helped make sure that every communication piece was ready to go when needed.

Message Saturation ­­- Critical Exposure sent repeated pitches and updates to our supporters via e-mail, Facebook, Twitter, community listservs, our website, phone calls, and more. Heck, we’d have sent candy-grams if we thought it would help. There was certainly concern about over-messaging, but as our supporters became more invested in the competition, they actually wanted more updates from us.

Empowered Supporters = Emotionally Invested Supporters­ ­- The power of crowd-sourcing was the key to our success. We realized that Critical Exposure didn’t have the resources to win this competition on our own. However, our supporters are an energetic, dedicated group of people and we knew that if we gave them the tools to help us, they would more than meet the challenge.

From day one, we made it clear that we didn’t just need our supporters to open their wallets (our suggested donation was just $10). What we really needed was their ability to leverage their personal networks. Every message asked them to be our fundraisers, and we gave them sample e-mails, Facebook and Twitter messages to post. By the end of the competition, my Facebook page was full of nothing but status updates from our supporters, each stating their own personal reason for supporting Critical Exposure.

We regularly updated our supporters on the fruits of their labor and during the final weeks of the competition, we pointed our supporters directly to the real-time standings. Many of our supporters later told us that as the competition entered its final days, they wore out the refresh buttons on their browser keeping tabs on the competition. Our supporters were 100% emotionally invested in the competition and did whatever they could to help Critical Exposure win.

The Results

Our supporters were an unstoppable fundraising force. Critical Exposure needed to raise $4000 from 50 donors — we raised over $15,000 from more than 600! That was 120 more donors than the next closest organization, 400 more than 3rd place and good enough for $5000 in additional bonuses.

The larger organizations may have had more big donors (the other prize winning organizations averaged $85 and $200 per donation, respectively). But no other organization got more people involved than Critical Exposure, who raised comparable money while averaging just $25 per donation!

[Here is  a snapshot of the the current Open Challenge leaderboard - where each organization and its donors can follow progress in real time]

http://www.globalgiving.com/dy/v2/globalchallenge.html

Lessons Learned

It was an exciting three weeks and everyone who participated truly felt like they were part of something very special. And really, that is why it worked. Our supporters aren’t just faceless masses (or cash machines) on the other end of an e-mail chain, but they are people, many who passionately believe in our causes as much as we do and are looking for an opportunity to help make a difference.

Facebook, Twitter, crowd-sourcing — these wonderful tools were what enabled us to tap into our supporters’ personal networks, but ultimately, it was about getting our supporters emotionally invested in being part of something big that carried us well past our wildest expectations.

This aritcle was written by Jared Schwartz, a consultant who advises non-profit organizations on using digital communications and social media applications to engage supporters, raise funds and build their organization.

google hunger relief campaign: simple ways to take a bite out of hunger

Posted by Donna Callejon on January 10th, 2013

Koro is a six-year old girl who arrived at A Child for All’s orphanage (ACFA) without a home or family, her thin body extremely malnourished.  The founder of ACFA, Kadiatou Sidibe, remembers the first meal Koro had with the organization in 2010.  “It was lunch-time, and you know how in Mali, we all eat around one large plate of food.  Koro saw the food; her eyes grew big.  Then she took the whole dish and ran away—she didn’t know that there would be another meal later.”

Koro’s health has improved dramatically with the help of ACFA and its donors throughout the world.  It’s hard to think that engineers and marketing managers 7,000 miles away in Mountain View, California are key to improving the life chances of Koro and other children at ACFA.  But the fact is, they are.

Recently Google, Inc. partnered with GlobalGiving to launch its Hunger Relief Campaign, an initiative that encouraged employee donations to hunger relief agencies globally.  Googlers took a short online quiz on food security to receive a GlobalGiving gift code that allowed them to donate US$10 online to a hunger-related project of their choice.

And no, they didn’t have to answer the quiz questions correctly.

ACFA is just one of fourteen projects listed on Globalgiving.org as part of Google’s campaign.  Googlers could give to unique projects in India, Haiti, Guatemala, and Kenya (to name a few) but also to U.S.-based ones like the River Fund Mobile Pantry’s project to aid Hyperstorm Sandy victims.

“We love working with new partners like Google that innovatively deploy our gift card program to support their employees’ passions,” explains Mari Kuraishi, Co-founder and President of the GlobalGiving Foundation.

For ACFA, ten dollars goes a long way.  “All of the children that come to us are malnourished.  Ten dollars can provide multivitamins for two months,” says Sidibe.  The Google Hunger Relief Campaign drew awareness to these issues and often, after redeeming the gift card and learning about the projects, employees chose to give an additional donation that their company matched.

Mali, where Koro is from, has one of the highest child mortality rates of children under age five in the world (178/1000).  Over half of these deaths are related to malnutrition.

And the situation isn’t getting any easier.  Droughts throughout the Sahel and rebel uprisings have struck simultaneously, leading to more than 400,000 displaced and in search of food or safety.   The United Nations claims that the current situation has left 600,000 children under the age of 5 threatened by severe malnutrition.

“The children are staying at my father’s house, the same house that I grew up in.”  The partnership with Google and GlobalGiving allows Sidibe to work towards what she’s long dreamed: a five-acre lot that can house up to one-hundred children and provide a medical facility, a school for grades one through nine, a library, and sports facilities.  “All of this will help support the larger local community as well.  People currently have to walk two kilometers to get to the closest medical facility.”

ACFA has already received a disbursement of US$4,750 through Google employee gift cards, a small fraction of total Google employee giving.  This amount represents two months of ACFA’s operating budget and more than the annual nutrition needs for the current twelve children.

The Google Hunger Relief Campaign concluded at the end of 2012 and the result is absolutely amazing.  Google employees donated nearly US$160,000 to provide more than 800,000 meals to communities around the world.

10 lessons in 10 years: you ain’t seen nothing yet.

Posted by Alison Carlman on December 21st, 2012

Ten years ago, Co-Founders Mari Kuraishi and Dennis Whittle launched GlobalGiving in the United States. In honor of the past ten years and in the spirit of one of our guiding core values, ‘Listen. Act. Learn. Repeat,’ we have launched a monthly blog series guest-written by former and current staff members. Each writer has spoken speak candidly about his or her experience with GlobalGiving and something that they learned. Dennis finishes off the year-long series with this post. 

Mari Kuraishi and Dennis Whittle, Co-Founders of GlobalGiving

The other day a friend asked me to look back at my professional career and tell her what I was most proud of.

“What do you mean?” I asked.

“Well, you did all those multi-hundred million dollar projects at the World Bank in the 1980s and 1990s.  And then you were instrumental in creating the original Innovation and Development Marketplaces there.

“And now GlobalGiving has helped over 7,000 projects around the globe get $100+ million in funding from 300,000 donors and some of the most innovative companies in the world.  Plus, GlobalGiving is one of the few online giving platforms that has attained financial self-sustainability.  So which of those things are you most proud of?” she asked.

I paused, but only briefly.

“What I am most proud of is the team that we have built.  Every time I walk in the office I have an almost overwhelming sense of pride in the people there.  If you come visit some day, you will feel a hum in the large, wide-open space. People will be concentrating intensely, but periodically the room will be punctuated by laughter or by a bang on the office gong, signaling some milestone or breakthrough.

“If you keep watching, you will see that someone has hit a road block or has a question, and he will walk over to a colleague’s desk to ask for help.  The two of them will confer quietly. Someone else will look up from their work and come over to join the conversation. If you get closer, you will hear that the task at hand involves something that most teams would consider impossible.  And yet the problem gets solved, and the impossible is achieved – if not the same day, then the next day, or in any case soon.

“In the area where we have our weekly all-hands meetings, you will see what some team members have inscribed in big letters high on the wall:

ALWAYS OPEN

NEVER SETTLE

COMMITTED TO WOW

LISTEN=> ACT=> LEARN=> REPEAT

“Those are not just words – they really are the tenets that guide our actions and decisions day in and day out.

“They are the values that explain why the team can do exceptional things when others are stymied.

“They are the principles that explain why forty people can run and continually improve a platform that supports thousands of heroic project leaders and hundreds of thousands of donors in over one hundred countries.

“They are the reason why you ain’t seen nothing yet.  GlobalGiving has achieved a lot in its first ten years.  But just wait until you see what GlobalGiving does in the next decade.”

That’s what I told my friend.

Good ideas are a dime a dozen. Well-executed ideas are rare, and there is no team that can execute like the gang at GlobalGiving.  My deepest appreciation goes to everyone who has been on our team since we first opened our doors ten years ago. Thank you all for making me so proud.