Grantee Spotlight: Range of Motion Project

The TripAdvisor Charitable Foundation partners with GlobalGiving in awarding grants to organizations that  relieve the suffering of people around the world.

Fabiola consults with Breyner about the fit of his prosthesis

Breyner’s path to mobility

Fabiola, a prosthetic technician for Range of Motion Project (ROMP), welcomes Breyner with a warm smile as he walks through the doors. A year prior, seven-year-old Breyner’s leg had been removed during his battle with cancer. Breyner and his mother Gabriela had made the two and a half hour trip to ROMP three months earlier after hearing that the organization provides free prostheses to children in need. For three months, Breyner used the prosthetic leg provided by ROMP to walk, run and jump. But as Breyner continued to grow, his prosthesis became uncomfortable, and he was forced to begin using crutches again to help with his mobility.

Fabiola measures Breyner and finds he has grown two centimeters in the last three months. His prosthesis will need to be lengthened slightly to enable him to walk comfortably again. Carlos, a prosthetic assistant, adjusts Breyner’s prosthesis in the ROMP workshop, changing out the rod that serves as Breyner’s lower leg for a slightly longer one. With his newly adjusted prosthesis, Breyner strolls confidently through the parallel bars and proudly shows off his mobility for the ROMP team.

TripAdvisor employee engagement: the beginning of a partnership

Though Breyner and his mother had to travel long distances to receive help from ROMP, the time investment came with a significant reward—realization of Breyner’s potential for mobility.

Patrick Mathay, former TripAdvisor Team Lead for Owner Support, also invested heavily in ROMP, though in a different way. In 2009, Patrick began volunteering with ROMP, conducting effectiveness surveys and providing fundraising support. During that time, he met patients like Breyner, whose lives have been altered by ROMP’s services. Seeing ROMP’s impact for himself inspired Patrick to take action through the TripAdvisor Charitable Foundation, which accepts grant proposals from nonprofit organizations that have been engaged with a TripAdvisor employee on a volunteer basis for at least six months. Patrick supported the ROMP team as they applied for the funding that would allow their organization to maximize its potential and reach more patients like Breyner. His initial support resulted in a significant reward for ROMP— multiple grant awards from the TripAdvisor Charitable Foundation and GlobalGiving over six years.

GlobalGiving partners with the TripAdvisor Charitable Foundation to vet, moderate, and manage all grants made through TripAdvisor’s Employee Grant Program. GlobalGiving has awarded more than a hundred grants in excess of $7 million in partnership with the TripAdvisor Charitable Foundation.

security in Guatemala

Patrick Mathay, Executive Director

Employee engagement grants: Investment in ROMP’s growth

The grants that the TripAdvisor Charitable Foundation has awarded in partnership with GlobalGiving have helped ROMP become a prosthetic industry leader in underserved communities. The ROMP clinic in Zacapa, Guatemala started as a single room where prosthetic technicians saw patients and built prosthetic molds. Today, ROMP is a full-service rehabilitation center that’s served more than 3,000 patients. It now boasts two patient rooms, a waiting area, parallel bars, a workshop, and a 3D printing lab.

Investment in ROMP has strengthened its operational foundation, helping it to transform from a volunteer-based organization to one with a strong team of professionals. ROMP is lead from their office in Quito, Ecuador by Patrick Mathay, a familiar face to ROMP who now serves as Executive Director, and Diana Antony, who serves as Operations Officer. Employee engagement with TripAdvisor is still ongoing following Patrick’s departure, and ROMP has continued to benefit from the skills of TripAdvisor employees, who have helped in areas such as social media and branding strategy. TripAdvisor’s volunteer engagement and support, recognized through a GlobalGiving grant, is allowing ROMP to make the adjustments needed to realize its potential.

ROMP’s mission is to provide high quality prosthetic care in underserved populations, which enhances mobility and unlocks human potential. ROMP believes in equal access to prosthetic and orthotic services that facilitate independence through mobility.

Using Social Media for Social Good

Some of the most incredible people raising money for projects on GlobalGiving don’t work for nonprofits. They’re people like you and me who are passionate about a cause and choose to raise money on behalf of an organization from their friends and family. GlobalGiving makes this possible with a feature we call the fundraiser tool. This is part two in a series for people using the fundraiser tool. 

Photo courtesy of CDI Apps for Good

Photo courtesy of CDI Apps for Good

The hardest part is over. You’ve emailed your friends and family inviting them to support your fundraiser. Hopefully, those first donations to your fundraiser have started trickling in, but now what? How can you keep that momentum going?

Now that you’ve shown your friends and family that you’re serious, it’s time to start thinking about promoting your fundraiser to a larger audience. Thanks to the power of social media, reaching out to your vast network has never been easier!

The trick to keeping your networks engaged with your fundraiser is creating a campaign. Give yourself a deadline and let everyone know about your fundraising goal. Then, use Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to build momentum around your campaign. Do more than ask people to give; tell a story! Share your milestones, send your supporters shout-outs, and give ongoing updates about the project you support.

Check out our favorite tips below to get your social media followers to engage with your campaign:

Twitter: Twitter has a strict character limit, but there’s no limit to the good you can do with just 140 characters. Since Twitter is such a fast-moving platform, don’t be afraid to post 3-5 times per day about your campaign. Be sure to include intriguing facts and information about the project you’re supporting!

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Pro-tip: Always use shortened links on Twitter to optimize space. is a great tool to shorten your links and you can track how many clicks your link has gotten.

Instagram: Did you know that the human brain processes images 60,000 times fast than text? Use this to your advantage when you showcase pictures from your chosen project. Sharing a photo on Instagram will help your friends and family feel more connected to the cause.


Pro-tip: Make sure you put the short link to your fundraiser in your Instagram bio. This gives your supporters easy access to your page from their phones.

FacebookOut of all forms of social media, our most popular fundraisers have had the most success with Facebook. Since there is no strict character limit, you have the opportunity to tell the story of what inspired you to start your fundraiser. We recommend writing a 4-5 sentence paragraph about your story, the cause—and most importantly—asking people to give.


Pro-tip: If you share a link to your page on Facebook, it will automatically pull through the default image from your fundraising page. Make sure you’re using a good one!

So what are you waiting for? Get sharing! Be sure to tag @GlobalGiving on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter so we can cheer you on!

Introducing the BRIDGE: A New Lookup Tool to Identify Global Social Sector Entities

BRIDGE mapMost of us take it for granted that the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration assigns every vehicle a Vehicle Identification Number (or VIN). This number makes it possible for buyers and sellers to track the story behind a car. With a bit of research, consumers like you or me can learn the history of a used vehicle before we buy it, without ever interacting with the car’s previous owners. This is only possible because the VIN acts as a unique identifier for the auto industry.

Until now, the social sector hasn’t had this basic building block for an information system. In order to easily share details about an organization’s social impact, financial performance, or eligibility, we must be able to firmly differentiate one organization from another.

This is the problem that Foundation Center, GlobalGiving, GuideStar, and TechSoup have set out to solve by creating BRIDGE (Basic Registry of Identified Global Entities). Publicly launching today,  BRIDGE is a system that assigns a unique identifying number—a “numerical fingerprint”—to philanthropic organizations across the globe.These can be non-governmental organizations, programs, and projects or other entities in the social sector, including schools and churches.  

Revolutionary Lookup Tool Now Available to the Public

BRIDGE logoThe BRIDGE project aims to revolutionize information sharing in order to better understand and track the flows of philanthropic dollars and thereby enhance transparency and effectiveness in the global social sector. Funded by Google Inc., the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and with support from the Markets for Good community, the BRIDGE project has reached a major milestone: the launch of a lookup tool.

Already there are nearly three million BRIDGE numbers assigned worldwide, a result of synchronizing information from the databases of founding partners Foundation Center, GlobalGiving, GuideStar, and TechSoup. Ongoing synchronization makes it easier to share and compare data among databases.

This week, BRIDGE launched a search tool at where anyone can look up an organization’s name, location, or BRIDGE Number. If you work with an NGO, it means that donors will be able to find your organization more easily to support your cause. If you’re a donor, it means you’ll be able to more easily find partner organizations that work in the fields you most care about. If you work with an intermediary organization, you’ll be able to find members or partners that work in your space and better serve your clients. Everyone, including NGOs, institutional funders, aid transparency organizations, and other NGO service providers can now have a more accurate and holistic picture of what’s happening in the nonprofit and international development sector.

Expect More Innovation

The founding partners intend to grow the collaborative BRIDGE project so that it can strengthen other philanthropic collaborations and create a more structured, transparent, and measurable philanthropic market. The knowledge derived from the BRIDGE project will also facilitate more strategic decision making by those who are working to create positive change across the globe.

This launch is an important milestone for the world of transparency, impact measurement, philanthropy, and nonprofit and social enterprise performance. In the same way that no one involved in the creation of Universal Product Codes (UPCs) in the 1970s could have anticipated the current crop of smartphone scanner apps, we expect BRIDGE to provide a foundation for future innovation that we can’t yet predict. We know BRIDGE will have far-reaching implications for philanthropic information sharing, but we can only begin to imagine the breadth of the project’s ultimate impact.

You can access the lookup tool at For more information, contact the BRIDGE organizers or sign up to receive future milestone announcements from the BRIDGE project.


4 Steps To Writing a Successful Fundraising Email

Some of the most incredible people raising money for projects on GlobalGiving don’t work for nonprofits. They’re people like you and me who are passionate about a cause and choose to raise money on behalf of an organization from their friends and family. GlobalGiving makes this possible with a feature we call the fundraiser tool.

Find out how one woman raised her own life event to raise funds for Kupona Foundation

Find out how one woman shared her story to raise funds for Kupona Foundation

As a former collegiate dance marathon fundraiser: I get it. Asking people to give to your fundraiser can be intimidating. However, reaching out to friends and family is one of the best ways to garner support for a cause that’s important to you! Starting out by asking your “inner circle” of close friends and family will help build momentum toward your fundraising goal.

One of my favorite ways to get started is to look at other successful fundraisers for inspiration! Check out Alison’s fundraising page that raised an incredible $2,474 for the Kupona Foundation. Let’s break down the email that helped her quadruple her goal:

1. Start with your connection to the cause. Odds are the people you are reaching out to care about YOU. Your personal connection is what will drive them to give. Providing your supporters with the story behind what motivated you to start fundraising will help motivate them to give to your fundraiser. Let’s begin with Alison’s awesome email opener:

Dear friends and family,

On July 22, 2013 I went into labor, never guessing it would be 5 days/6 nights until I delivered my baby girl! But not for a second did I worry about access to medical help if I needed it. One year later, I can’t help but think of other moms—those with high-risk pregnancies—who don’t have access to the life-saving care they need…

2. Introduce the project or organizationOn GlobalGiving, all projects already have descriptions of what they aim to accomplish. Take advantage of the information at your fingertips! Help your supporters understand the earth-changing work of the project you’re looking to support:

Tanzania is one of the most dangerous places in the world to give birth. The goal of the Make Motherhood Safe for Tanzanian Women project on GlobalGiving is to provide a safe space for women in Tanzania to give birth. Thousands of women do not have access to the quality care that they need and the Kupona Foundation is committed to changing that.

3. Demonstrate the potential impact. Let your supporters know how their donation will make an impact. The easier is it for your friends and family to see how their support will make a tangible difference, the more compelled they will be to give.

Your donation can make the difference in the life of a mother and her baby. Did you know that for just $10 the Kupona Foundation can provide an ultrasound for woman with a high-risk pregnancy in Tanzania?

4. Ask them to give. Be as clear as possible about what you are asking for: their financial support. Use one sentence to make a powerful, straightforward message to ask your friends and family to join you in supporting the cause. Always be sure to link it back to your page!

Join me by donating $1 for every hour you (or a loved one) were in labor. Motherhood comes in all shapes and sizes, but one thing we have in common is that most of us have access to emergency medical help if we need it during pregnancy and parenthood. Let’s make sure other moms and babies do too.

There isn’t just one perfect formula to ask people to donate to your fundraiser. But if you need a place to start, try describing your connection to the cause, introducing the project or organization that’s making a difference, sharing about the potential impact of a gift, and making a specific ask.  Chances are, you’ll be surprised to see how your community will respond!

This is part one of a five-part series of tips, tricks, and tools to help GlobalGivers make the biggest impact possible with their fundraiser page.

Making it Easier to do Good

photo credit Monarch Butterfly Fund

GlobalGiving was founded to democratize aid and philanthropy, and in 2008, we launched the first Open Challenge campaign, making it easier for any nonprofit in the world to share its idea about how to make their community a better place. Organizations were given a specific time period to reach a set fundraising goal, and those that were successful in reaching that goal were welcomed as permanent members of the GlobalGiving community.

Thousands of nonprofits from almost every country on the map have participated in Open Challenge campaigns since then, many of whom are still active partners of GlobalGiving, continuing to access the training, support, and resources to improve their communities. Nevertheless, we often received feedback that the time restrictions created by the Open Challenge were too rigid to accommodate busy calendars. We also heard that some wonderful organizations weren’t able to qualify for permanent membership in the time allotted, even though they were committed to learning, improving, and doing great work in their community.

Last year we took a long, hard look at the way new potential partners interact with GlobalGiving, and we challenged ourselves to think creatively about how we could provide more value and greater opportunity to nonprofits around the world. We’ve decided to  implement some changes in 2016 that will hopefully make joining GlobalGiving faster, easier, and more flexible for potential partners.