Using Social Media for Social Good

Some of the most incredible people raising money for projects on GlobalGiving don’t work for nonprofits. They’re people like you and me who are passionate about a cause and choose to raise money on behalf of an organization from their friends and family. GlobalGiving makes this possible with a feature we call the fundraiser tool. This is part two in a series for people using the fundraiser tool. 

Photo courtesy of CDI Apps for Good

Photo courtesy of CDI Apps for Good

The hardest part is over. You’ve emailed your friends and family inviting them to support your fundraiser. Hopefully, those first donations to your fundraiser have started trickling in, but now what? How can you keep that momentum going?

Now that you’ve shown your friends and family that you’re serious, it’s time to start thinking about promoting your fundraiser to a larger audience. Thanks to the power of social media, reaching out to your vast network has never been easier!

The trick to keeping your networks engaged with your fundraiser is creating a campaign. Give yourself a deadline and let everyone know about your fundraising goal. Then, use Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to build momentum around your campaign. Do more than ask people to give; tell a story! Share your milestones, send your supporters shout-outs, and give ongoing updates about the project you support.

Check out our favorite tips below to get your social media followers to engage with your campaign:

Twitter: Twitter has a strict character limit, but there’s no limit to the good you can do with just 140 characters. Since Twitter is such a fast-moving platform, don’t be afraid to post 3-5 times per day about your campaign. Be sure to include intriguing facts and information about the project you’re supporting!

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Pro-tip: Always use shortened links on Twitter to optimize space. Bit.ly is a great tool to shorten your links and you can track how many clicks your link has gotten.

Instagram: Did you know that the human brain processes images 60,000 times fast than text? Use this to your advantage when you showcase pictures from your chosen project. Sharing a photo on Instagram will help your friends and family feel more connected to the cause.

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Pro-tip: Make sure you put the short link to your fundraiser in your Instagram bio. This gives your supporters easy access to your page from their phones.

FacebookOut of all forms of social media, our most popular fundraisers have had the most success with Facebook. Since there is no strict character limit, you have the opportunity to tell the story of what inspired you to start your fundraiser. We recommend writing a 4-5 sentence paragraph about your story, the cause—and most importantly—asking people to give.

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Pro-tip: If you share a link to your page on Facebook, it will automatically pull through the default image from your fundraising page. Make sure you’re using a good one!

So what are you waiting for? Get sharing! Be sure to tag @GlobalGiving on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter so we can cheer you on!

Introducing the BRIDGE: A New Lookup Tool to Identify Global Social Sector Entities

BRIDGE mapMost of us take it for granted that the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration assigns every vehicle a Vehicle Identification Number (or VIN). This number makes it possible for buyers and sellers to track the story behind a car. With a bit of research, consumers like you or me can learn the history of a used vehicle before we buy it, without ever interacting with the car’s previous owners. This is only possible because the VIN acts as a unique identifier for the auto industry.

Until now, the social sector hasn’t had this basic building block for an information system. In order to easily share details about an organization’s social impact, financial performance, or eligibility, we must be able to firmly differentiate one organization from another.

This is the problem that Foundation Center, GlobalGiving, GuideStar, and TechSoup have set out to solve by creating BRIDGE (Basic Registry of Identified Global Entities). Publicly launching today,  BRIDGE is a system that assigns a unique identifying number—a “numerical fingerprint”—to philanthropic organizations across the globe.These can be non-governmental organizations, programs, and projects or other entities in the social sector, including schools and churches.  

Revolutionary Lookup Tool Now Available to the Public

BRIDGE logoThe BRIDGE project aims to revolutionize information sharing in order to better understand and track the flows of philanthropic dollars and thereby enhance transparency and effectiveness in the global social sector. Funded by Google Inc., the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and with support from the Markets for Good community, the BRIDGE project has reached a major milestone: the launch of a lookup tool.

Already there are nearly three million BRIDGE numbers assigned worldwide, a result of synchronizing information from the databases of founding partners Foundation Center, GlobalGiving, GuideStar, and TechSoup. Ongoing synchronization makes it easier to share and compare data among databases.

This week, BRIDGE launched a search tool at bridge-registry.org where anyone can look up an organization’s name, location, or BRIDGE Number. If you work with an NGO, it means that donors will be able to find your organization more easily to support your cause. If you’re a donor, it means you’ll be able to more easily find partner organizations that work in the fields you most care about. If you work with an intermediary organization, you’ll be able to find members or partners that work in your space and better serve your clients. Everyone, including NGOs, institutional funders, aid transparency organizations, and other NGO service providers can now have a more accurate and holistic picture of what’s happening in the nonprofit and international development sector.

Expect More Innovation

The founding partners intend to grow the collaborative BRIDGE project so that it can strengthen other philanthropic collaborations and create a more structured, transparent, and measurable philanthropic market. The knowledge derived from the BRIDGE project will also facilitate more strategic decision making by those who are working to create positive change across the globe.

This launch is an important milestone for the world of transparency, impact measurement, philanthropy, and nonprofit and social enterprise performance. In the same way that no one involved in the creation of Universal Product Codes (UPCs) in the 1970s could have anticipated the current crop of smartphone scanner apps, we expect BRIDGE to provide a foundation for future innovation that we can’t yet predict. We know BRIDGE will have far-reaching implications for philanthropic information sharing, but we can only begin to imagine the breadth of the project’s ultimate impact.

You can access the lookup tool at bridge-registry.org. For more information, contact the BRIDGE organizers or sign up to receive future milestone announcements from the BRIDGE project.

 

4 Steps To Writing a Successful Fundraising Email

Some of the most incredible people raising money for projects on GlobalGiving don’t work for nonprofits. They’re people like you and me who are passionate about a cause and choose to raise money on behalf of an organization from their friends and family. GlobalGiving makes this possible with a feature we call the fundraiser tool.

Find out how one woman raised her own life event to raise funds for Kupona Foundation

Find out how one woman shared her story to raise funds for Kupona Foundation

As a former collegiate dance marathon fundraiser: I get it. Asking people to give to your fundraiser can be intimidating. However, reaching out to friends and family is one of the best ways to garner support for a cause that’s important to you! Starting out by asking your “inner circle” of close friends and family will help build momentum toward your fundraising goal.

One of my favorite ways to get started is to look at other successful fundraisers for inspiration! Check out Alison’s fundraising page that raised an incredible $2,474 for the Kupona Foundation. Let’s break down the email that helped her quadruple her goal:

1. Start with your connection to the cause. Odds are the people you are reaching out to care about YOU. Your personal connection is what will drive them to give. Providing your supporters with the story behind what motivated you to start fundraising will help motivate them to give to your fundraiser. Let’s begin with Alison’s awesome email opener:

Dear friends and family,

On July 22, 2013 I went into labor, never guessing it would be 5 days/6 nights until I delivered my baby girl! But not for a second did I worry about access to medical help if I needed it. One year later, I can’t help but think of other moms—those with high-risk pregnancies—who don’t have access to the life-saving care they need…

2. Introduce the project or organizationOn GlobalGiving, all projects already have descriptions of what they aim to accomplish. Take advantage of the information at your fingertips! Help your supporters understand the earth-changing work of the project you’re looking to support:

Tanzania is one of the most dangerous places in the world to give birth. The goal of the Make Motherhood Safe for Tanzanian Women project on GlobalGiving is to provide a safe space for women in Tanzania to give birth. Thousands of women do not have access to the quality care that they need and the Kupona Foundation is committed to changing that.

3. Demonstrate the potential impact. Let your supporters know how their donation will make an impact. The easier is it for your friends and family to see how their support will make a tangible difference, the more compelled they will be to give.

Your donation can make the difference in the life of a mother and her baby. Did you know that for just $10 the Kupona Foundation can provide an ultrasound for woman with a high-risk pregnancy in Tanzania?

4. Ask them to give. Be as clear as possible about what you are asking for: their financial support. Use one sentence to make a powerful, straightforward message to ask your friends and family to join you in supporting the cause. Always be sure to link it back to your page!

Join me by donating $1 for every hour you (or a loved one) were in labor. Motherhood comes in all shapes and sizes, but one thing we have in common is that most of us have access to emergency medical help if we need it during pregnancy and parenthood. Let’s make sure other moms and babies do too.

There isn’t just one perfect formula to ask people to donate to your fundraiser. But if you need a place to start, try describing your connection to the cause, introducing the project or organization that’s making a difference, sharing about the potential impact of a gift, and making a specific ask.  Chances are, you’ll be surprised to see how your community will respond!

This is part one of a five-part series of tips, tricks, and tools to help GlobalGivers make the biggest impact possible with their fundraiser page.

Making it Easier to do Good

photo credit Monarch Butterfly Fund

GlobalGiving was founded to democratize aid and philanthropy, and in 2008, we launched the first Open Challenge campaign, making it easier for any nonprofit in the world to share its idea about how to make their community a better place. Organizations were given a specific time period to reach a set fundraising goal, and those that were successful in reaching that goal were welcomed as permanent members of the GlobalGiving community.

Thousands of nonprofits from almost every country on the map have participated in Open Challenge campaigns since then, many of whom are still active partners of GlobalGiving, continuing to access the training, support, and resources to improve their communities. Nevertheless, we often received feedback that the time restrictions created by the Open Challenge were too rigid to accommodate busy calendars. We also heard that some wonderful organizations weren’t able to qualify for permanent membership in the time allotted, even though they were committed to learning, improving, and doing great work in their community.

Last year we took a long, hard look at the way new potential partners interact with GlobalGiving, and we challenged ourselves to think creatively about how we could provide more value and greater opportunity to nonprofits around the world. We’ve decided to  implement some changes in 2016 that will hopefully make joining GlobalGiving faster, easier, and more flexible for potential partners.

What 2015 Taught Us About Improving Employee Engagement

Employee engagement and culture issues are the number one human resources challenge for companies according to Deloitte’s 2015 Global Human Capital Trends study. More than 85% of respondents cite this challenge as “important,” including 50% who say it is “very important.” But for all the recent buzz around employee engagement, misconceptions around the true meaning of the term are still common.

A Forbes contributor defines employee engagement as the emotional commitment the employee has to the organization and its goals. But on corporate employee engagement strategies, Gallup Business Journal contributors note, “Many make the mistake of prioritizing the easy, shiny stuff — hip office space, remote work arrangements, and inventive benefits — over the elements that will strengthen emotional ties and connect employees more deeply to their managers, teams, and companies.”

This may be part of the reason why a low 13% of employees worldwide are engaged.

 

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Gallup estimates that employees who fall into the “not engaged” and “actively disengaged” categories collectively cost $319 to $398 billion annually in the U.S. alone. And two important CSR target groups, managers and millennials, have low levels of engagement: Millennials, who are set to make up 75% of the global workforce by 2030, are the least engaged generation, and only 35% of managers are engaged in their jobs.

Implementing strategies that reach the individual emotional level can be a logistical challenge, especially for global companies with diverse workforces. Luckily, with companies’ increased prioritization of employee engagement, there has been a flood of research on the topic.

Here are 3 ways companies can bridge the divide:

1. Recognize your employees, with a focus on values-based recognition

The O.C. Tanner Institute finds that recognition has a direct impact on causing great work, increasing engagement, encouraging innovation and productivity, improving trust and manager relationships, and attracting and retaining talent. In particular, HR leaders and practitioners reported in the 2015 SHRM/Globoforce Survey that values-based recognition programs significantly contribute to bottom-line organizational metrics – engagement, retention, safety, wellness, employer brand, and even cost controls – and help employers create a stronger culture and more human workplace.

EMC, a global leader in information technology as a service, has aligned its recognition program with its overall CSR strategy. Each month, new hires and employees celebrating a service anniversary are sent a $25 GlobalGiving e-gift card that can be redeemed in support of global projects aligned with EMC’s Giving Back strategy supporting causes such as education, food, water, and disaster relief.

2. Offer year-round workplace giving opportunities

For the past three years, the America’s Charities Snapshot Series has tracked changes in workplace-centered philanthropy and employee engagement. Snapshot 2015 – The New Corporate DNA: Where Employee Engagement and Social Impact Converge finds dramatic shifts in employee-giving models from past years. This year, almost two-thirds (60%) of corporate respondents say they offer year-round opportunities for employees to give.

In 3BL Media’s webinar on the report, Heather Lofkin Wright, Director of Corporate Responsibility at PwC US spoke to this change, “There’s no shortage of experiences, news items, interactions that move someone to want to give back. And we as a corporate entity are not in the position to put a time frame on that. So having things available 365 days a year for our people to do is really critical for giving through the workplace to be a significant onramp and opportunity that our people will take advantage of.”

3. Provide your employees with skills-based/pro-bono volunteering opportunities

The BCCCC’s 2015 Community Involvement Study found that among companies that measure the connection between volunteering and employee engagement, 89% found a positive correlation between participation and high engagement scores. Company representatives also report that volunteering helps to establish positive brand within operating communities and displays organizational values in action.

Tech companies are increasingly encouraging their employees to volunteer tech skills to organizations that lack proper funds and staff. For example, the Hewlett Packard Enterprise Advising program allows HPE employees to offer their professional expertise and advice to nonprofits and entrepreneurs at no cost. In the past, HPE employees have helped in a variety of key business areas, including branding and marketing, IT, business planning, managing staff, and recruiting volunteers. Through its partnership with GlobalGiving, HPE has been able to provide support to more than 200 international nonprofits.

Rethinking your employee engagement strategy in 2016? Reach out to our Business Partnerships Team to learn what other companies are doing to build a more motivated workforce: https://www.globalgiving.org/companies/contact-us/